Will Wi-Fi 7 Replace Wired Ethernet?

We all want the best connection possible – Whether that’s wireless or wired. Here at Geekabit, we love all things Wi-Fi, but even we will admit when a wired Ethernet connection could bring more stability and reliability. 

The Wi-Fi cimmunity is all a-buzz with talk about Wi-Fi 7 and the latest improvements it will bring to the wireless world. But will it replace internet via wired Ethernet cables? Theoretically, Wi-Fi 7 should have a top speed that would make it a worthy opponent of LAN’s. But that wouldn’t be the case in all situations. 

Let’s take a closer look. 

What is Wi-Fi 7?

This next generation of wireless technology is well on the way. And with the promise of even higher data rates and lower latency than the current Wi-Fi 6 offering!

Wi-Fi 7 (or 802.11be to be technically correct), in comparison to Wi-Fi 6, will:

  • Use multi-band/ multi-channel aggregation and operation 
  • Deliver higher spectrum and power efficiency
  • Have better interference mitigations
  • Offer higher capacity density 
  • Have higher cost efficiency. 

As a result of the projected ability for it to support up to 30Gbps throughput, this seventh generation of Wi-Fi is also being referred to as Wi-Fi Extremely High Throughput. It will be approximately 3 times faster than Wi-Fi 6.  

How does Wi-Fi 7 work?

The Wi-Fi engineers over at IEEE are proving that there are still ways to enhance and improve Wi-Fi – Even since Wi-Fi 6. As we’ve set out above, Wi-Fi 7 will not only give another boost to Wi-Fi connectivity, but also significant improvements in performance whilst further reducing latency. 

But how? 

Wi-Fi 7 doubles the channel size

With Wi-Fi 7, we see the maximum channel size double, going from 160MHz to 320Mhz. This also means that the throughput is automatically doubled as well.  Not only that, but it’s more flexible too, enabling networks to run with either one channel (at 320Mhz) or two channels (each at 160Mhz). Therefore you can match the network to the requirements of your applications.  

Wi-Fi 7 doubles the number of MU-MIMO spatial streams

The throughout is also doubled via the available MU-MIMO spatial streams which increases from 8 to 16, again doubling what’s available. The connection is shared equally, dividing the bandwidth into separate streams using Multiple-user, multiple-input multiple output (MU-MIMO) technology.  

We tend to see quite a bit of congestion from multiple endpoints attempting to access the wireless network at the same time – But MU-MIMO helps to reduce this congestion. Not only that, but it supports bi-directional functionality. This means that the router and both accet and send data at the same time. Something that was limited to just downlink transmission with Wi-Fi 5! 

Wi-Fi 7 quadruples the QAM

Quadratic Amplitude Modulation (QAM) is increased with Wi-Fi 7 from 1024 to 4096. It is expected that this increase will enable the delivery of an additional 20% in throughput. It’s this that takes us from Wi-Fi 6’s 9.6Mbps to Wi-Fi 7’s 46Mbps. 

Wi-Fi 7 offers Multi-link operation (MLO)

The great thing about MLO is that devices can transmit and receive across all of the available frequency bands (2.4Ghz, 5Ghz and 6Ghz), simultaneously. What does this mean? 

  • It improves performance
  • It reduces latency
  • It boosts reliability
  • In IoT or IIoT environments, specific channels can have pre-assigned data flows based on the requirements of the application or device
  • Networks can be dynamically configured so that they can select the frequency band that has the lowest congestion in real time, sending data over that preferred channel

Wi-Fi 7 offers Multi-AP operation

The functionality available in current and previous Wi-Fi standards meant that each access point acted independently when accepting connection requests from endpoints and moving traffic back and forth to that endpoint. The Multi-AP operation with Wi-Fi 7 uses mesh technology to configure neighbouring AP’s so that they can coordinate with each, thus improving the utilisation of the spectrum and resources. Network engineers can use Multi-AP operation to program a set of APs to form a subsystem and accurately coordinate channel access and transmission schedules.

Time-sensitive networking (TSN) with Wi-Fi 7 

What is TSN? Time-sensitive networking is an IEEE standard to help increase reliability and lower latency. Wi-Fi 7 supports this TSN. It was originally designed to help reduce buffering and latency in Ethernet networks by using time scheduling. This ensures the reliable delivery of packets in real-time applications. 

Multi-RU and WI-Fi 7

Using OFDMA (orthogonal frequency division multiple access), Resource Units are assigned to individual clients to enable access points to communicate simultaneously with multiple clients.  Multi Resouce Units increase the spectrum efficiency, ensuring that traffic avoids any interference on congested channels.

Wi-Fi 7 and deterministic low latency 

Wi-Fi 7 will be able to support real-time applications like AR, VR and IoT due to the combination of the above technologies decreasing latency. In certain situations, for example some industrial automation applications, it’s important that there is not a wide variance in latency. Deterministic low latency with Wi-Fi 7 will be great for this – It means that it will not spike beyond a certain limit. 

What are the benefits of Wi-Fi 7?

You might be thinking that the current Wi-Fi standard is good enough for you and your business connection needs. But the thing is, the wireless traffic load is only going to grow year on year and over time, organisations are going to have no choice but to embrace (and need) digital transformation. So whilst what you have now may well be sufficient, it might not be the case in forever. 

We are all well aware that the business operations that were once done manually are now being done digitally. This also means that the amount of data we use and need to move is growing all the time. 

Digital transformation means that not only has paper turned digital, but processes that were once quite simple are now much more complex, interconnected with others and across multiple applications. 

The improvements and enhancements we will see with Wi-Fi 7 have been designed to accommodate the increased traffic and data we are seeing from digital transformation. 

So – Will Wi-Fi 7 replace Ethernet?

Perhaps the biggest gane changer when it comes to Wi-Fi 7 is that it could in fact replace wired Ethernet in certain circumstances. We’re thinking in offices where everything is all completely wireless, everything unplugged, IT staff could use Wi-Fi 7 instead of having ti run wires and cables through ceilings, walls and office space.  Pretty handy! 

We also talked about the speed of Wi-Fi 7 earlier. Theoretically the maximum speed is 46Gbps. Even in real-world estimates where we’re talking much lower speeds of 6Gbps, Wi-Fi 7 is still faster than Gigabit Ethernet. 

When it comes to comparing Wi-Fi 7 and Ethernet, it’s worth considering bandwidth and endpoints. Wirelessly, the bandwidth is shared among endpoints. With Gigabit Ethernet, each endpoint has dedicated delivery of gigabit circuits. 

Whilst this may sway you back towards Ethernet, don’t forget that wireless networks, particularly ones using Wi-Fi 7, can use multiple antennas and streams. With the meshing of AP’s  with Wi-Fi 7, it might be wise to test the real-world performance to analyse what is necessary for your environment. It can get quite complex, but is definitely necessary when designing and deploying a new network or updating your current malfunctioning one. 

There are tech experts that are expecting Wi-Fi 7 to be a strong contender to replace Ethernet connections for super-high-bandwidth applications. It’s expected that the advances we’ll be seeing with Wi-Fi 7 will make it a very attractive option for a broad range of devices, applications and industries. 

Here at Geekabit, our Wi-Fi experts think it’s a bit early to predict whether or not Wi-Fi 7 will replace Ethernet on a large scale for enterprise LAN connectivity. On paper there may be a chance, but the low-maintenance predictability of Ethernet may make IT teams hold off replacing it for Wi-Fi 7. 

Many IT departments already enjoy the best of both worlds, utilising a pre-existing Ethernet LAN with a wireless network added on top. We don’t see why Wi-Fi 7 and Ethernet can’t co-exist, with Wi-Fi 7 being the primary network and good old, trusty Ethernet in the background quietly waiting as a backup. 

Get in touch with our Wi-Fi Experts

If you are wondering whether you should repace your Ethernet cables with Wi-Fi, or the other way around, then do get in touch with our Wi-Fi experts here at Geekabit. We can help advise what would work best for you and get a network designed and installed for your individual needs. Let’s solve your Wi-Fi woes and get reliable internet into your home office! You can get in touch on 0203 322 2443 (London), 01962 657 390 (Hampshire) or 02920 676712 (Cardiff).

How Much Does It Cost to Have Ethernet Cables Installed in my Home Office?

Are you a regular remote worker working from the comfort of your own home, relying on your Wi-Fi connection for Zoom meetings and video conferencing? Or do you mostly use your home internet for a Netflix binge to unwind after a long day? 

Either way, having your connection buffer is not what you need – Whether it’s that all-important Zoom call or half way through the last epic episode of Stranger Things. 

You need a fast, reliable connection. If this is something you are struggling with in your home office then installing Ethernet cables could help. 

Our Wi-Fi experts can design a network to suit your home and requirements and implement it, giving you the strongest, most reliable Wi-Fi connection possible for your house. 

Why can home networks struggle with Wi-Fi connections?

Where home networks tend to struggle is when the wireless connection doesn’t reach every part of the house. Not great if your home office happens to be in one of those black spots! Homes that are particularly large tend to struggle the most. 

If your router is downstairs, most commonly next to the telephone or television, then it might struggle to reach your home office if it’s a floor or two up or out in the garden. The noise of family life might not reach you – But neither will your internet connection! That distance could be slowing you down. 

It’s not just larger homes that struggle. Even some smaller houses can get Wi-Fi blackspots, particularly if they use modern foil insulation. 

What can you do about slow internet at home?

The frustratingly slow internet connections you get from Wi-Fi black spots at home can fortunately be combated with Ethernet cables. 

All we hear about when it comes to Wi-Fi is wireless, wireless, wireless. Everything nowadays seems to be wireless! But in situations where you need to stream lots of videos, transfer data or utilise video conferencing, there could be a better way.

Hang on a minute, what is this blasphemy against wireless? Well, Ethernet cables. If your Wi-Fi is struggling to reach your home office, and you’re relying on it for video calls and data transfers then Ethernet cables are going to be your friend. 

If you’re wondering whether or not you should opt for Ethernet cables over wireless then you might find this previous blog of ours a helpful read.   

With the current heatwave we’re experiencing in Hampshire, London and all across the South East of England currently then we wouldn’t blame you for trying to soak up some sunshine whilst working! If you are wanting a reliable internet connection in your outdoor home office or out in the garden for working from home, then running an Ethernet cable would be our first suggestion. 

There are different types of Ethernet cables – Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat7. You can read more about the types of Ethernet cables in our previous blog here as well as a comparison between Cat6 and Cat 7 here. The main things to know are:

  • Cat5: A bit older and slower
  • Cat5e: Faster and with less interference
  • Cat6: Even faster, but not always completely necessary
  • Cat7: Faster again with higher frequency and bandwidth

The blogs linked above go into more detail and how to choose the best one for your needs. Or you could just leave it to the Wi-Fi experts, couldn’t you?

How much will it cost to install Ethernet cables in my home office?

Every home is different, so the requirements to ensure a strong internet connection will vary slightly house to house. 

When it comes to a home network there are various things to consider that will affect the network design and total cost:

  • Whether the network is wireless or wired
  • Cable installation
  • Access to the internet
  • Configuration
  • Hardware installation
  • Software installation 

Once all of this is installed and configured, you should find that your connection is faster and more reliable – No more buffering mid Zoom conversation!

Price wise you are likely looking at between approximately £200 and £500. The lower end of the price range would be for installing an extra Ethernet port in an internal home office, with the higher price point for cabling from the home to an outside home office. 

Of course, as we said above, the price will depend on individual requirements as well as the size of your home and easy it would be to wire. 

At the end of the day, installing Ethernet cables for your home office will likely improve how reliable your internet connection is. And if slow internet is causing you daily frustration then resolving the issue with the cost of installing Ethernet cables will be so worth it, won’t it?

Get in touch with our Wi-Fi Experts

If you are wondering whether Ethernet cables could help solve your Wi-Fi woes and get reliable internet into your home office then do get in touch with our Wi-Fi experts here at Geekabit. We can help advise what would work best for you and get a network designed and installed for your individual needs. You get in touch on 0203 322 2443 (London), 01962 657 390 (Hampshire) or 02920 676712 (Cardiff).

Wi-Fi 7 – World’s First Router Released

It feels like we’ve only recently been talking about Wi-Fi 6 being new on the internet scene, when up pops Wi-Fi 7! But actually, you might not know that the Wi-Fi 7 chipset infrastructure has actually already been available for a few months. 

Not only that, but last month we also saw the release of the world’s first Wi-Fi 7 router. Powered by Qualcomm, this router is the H3C Magic BE18000 Tri-band Wi-Fi 7 router. 

There’s not a great deal of information available yet as it’s so new, but look out for more from the China-based network technology vendor H3C for more announcements. 

This new Wi-Fi 7 router can purportedly deliver 18.443 Gbps peak data rate (which explains the BE 18000 in the name..) on 3 bands. 

What features will this new Wi-Fi 7 router support?

Due to it being powered by Qualcomm’s Networking Pro 1220 platform, the H3C Wi-Fi 7 router can support all the Wi-Fi 7 features you would expect it to, including:

  • 320 MHz channels
  • 4kQAM modulation
  • MLO

As the unit is tri-band, it is configured for 4×4 MU-MIMO on each of the 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 6 GHz bands.

When will we see Wi-Fi 7 devices available on the market?

During May, Qualcomm as well as another 2 major chipset vendors introduced their offering of Wi-Fi 7 chipsets for both the device side and network side. 

As the prevalence of Wi-Fi 7 platforms increases, we’re likely to then start seeing Wi-Fi 7 devices appear on the market. We could be seeing Wi-Fi 7 enabled phones and laptops as early as the end of this year or early next year! 

We wouldn’t be surprised if the most influential technology event in the world, CES, will see the launch of the first Wi-Fi 7 device in 2023. 

Is Wi-Fi 7 certified by the Wi-Fi Alliance?

Before we get too carried away with all things Wi-Fi 7, it’s important to note that there is not currently any Wi-Fi 7 certification from the Wi-Fi Alliance. This means that even though the H3C Wi-Fi 7 router has been revealed, it cannot yet be certified as Wi-Fi 7. 

So technically, it’s more accurate for us to say that the H3C Wi-Fi 7 router has been designed in line with the standard IEEE 802.11be. 

But being the Wi-Fi geeks that we are – We are still pretty excited at the prospect of Wi-Fi 7 and a router that likely meets the upcoming features and specifications. 

Watch this space! 

Image from https://www.h3c.com/en/Products_Technology/Enterprise_Products/IntelligentTerminalProducts/Magic/BE18000/

How Can I Accurately Check My Mobile Signal Strength? 

Did you know that there is much more to mobile signal strength than just the signal bar display? The real test for measuring your mobile signal strength accurately is the Field Test Mode. The results from this test can help you determine whether you might need a mobile signal booster. 

There are many factors that can affect your mobile signal strength, for example, whether you are inside or outside a building, how far you are from the cell tower etc. So let’s look at the Field Test Mode and how to use it. 

Signal Strength: How To Choose a Mobile Signal Booster

You can’t choose a mobile signal booster for your home or business if you don’t know how strong the outside signal is. And we don’t just mean ‘how many bars you’ve got.’ Yes, that gives some indication of how strong the signal is, but there is a more accurate way to measure mobile signal strength. 

Did you know that different phones have different numbers of bars? Some have 5, some have 4, some even have 8! Not only this, but even when phones have the same number of bars for signal strength, there isn’t actually any standardisation for them. Having 4 bars of signal on one phone can mean something different to having 4 bars on another phone. 

It’s pretty clear that measuring mobile signal strength purely by the number of bars isn’t very specific.

When experts measure mobile signal strength, they measure it in decibels. They are very precise and are much more informative and accurate for doing a mobile signal strength test. Testing in this way means you can find out just how strong the signal is that you are receiving. 

What Is Field Test Mode? 

You may not realise that the majority of phones have Field Test Mode – A built-in setting that can show you very useful information about your phone. This includes the signal strength, measured in decibels. 

We can imagine that you’ve already tried to find this on your phone right this second to check it out! We don’t blame you. But let’s just go through a couple of things to consider before you start taking mobile signal strength readings.

  • Carrier – Remember that the signal strength readings you take are only true for the mobile carrier of said phone. To compare the signal strength to other carriers, you would need phones on those carriers. Basically, even if you get 4 different service providers, you can only test the signal strength of the carrier of your phone when in Field Test Mode. 
  • Network – You need to know if the signal you are measuring is from an LTE network or not in order to interpret the results. LTE readings can be read differently from previous generation networks (like 2G, 3G and 4G0. 

How do you use Field Test Mode on an iPhone?

If you have an iPhone, you’ll find that it has a hidden built-in Field Test Mode app. Follow these steps to access it:

  1. Go to Settings > Wi-Fi and turn Wi-Fi Off.
    You will need the Wi-Fi to be turned off in order to be able to see the network you are connected to (e.g. 3G). 
  2. For iOS 9.3 and above: Go into Settings > Cellular > Cellular Data Options > Enable LTE and turn LTE to Off.
    For iOS 9.2 and below: Go into Settings > Cellular > Enable LTE and turn LTE to Off.
    As we said above, LTE readings can be very different from previous networks. In order to be able to best interpret the results, it’s ideal to get your signal readings from a previous generation network.
    If you like, you could then repeat the site survey with LTE enabled, which would give you readings for different generation networks. 
  3. To launch the Field Test Mode app, go to your Phone Keypad, dial *3001#12345#* and press the Call button. You’ll notice that where before you had signal bars, you now have a negative number. This negative number is the decibel signal strength reading. You should also see the carrier name and the type of network.  
  4. Tap on LTE
  5. Tap on “Serving Cell Meas”
  6. Look for “rsrp0” and the number corresponding will be the numerical measurement of the iPhone cellular signal strength in dBm

To start taking signal strength readings, you need to move to the location where you want to take the reading and then wait for between 30 and 60 seconds for the signal strength readings to catch up. You can record the signal strength, network type and carrier. 

Once you’ve finished taking readings, you can return to your normal iPhone settings by pressing the home button. Don’t forget to go back in and enable Wi-Fi and Cellular LTE! 

How do you use Field Test Mode on an Android?

To access Field Test Mode on an Android follow these simple steps:

  • Go to Settings > “About Phone”
  • Depending on the model of your phone, look for ‘Network’ or ‘Status’ to see your numerical signal strength in decibel 
  • You can usually see Network Type near the signal strength option. 

If you’re after a bit more information, there are apps you can download from Google Pay that will give you the signal strength in decibels as well as other info. To see the available apps search for ‘cell signal’ in the App Store. DOwnload whichever one is compatible with your phone, tablet or device. 

Just like with an iPhone, get ready to take signal readings by moving to the location you want to know the signal strength for. Stop and wait for between 30 and 60 seconds to let the signal readings catch up with you and then you can record them along with the network type (2G, 3G, 4G, LTE etc). 

Keep doing this until you have recorded the signal strength for all the locations in your home or business. 

What would I use mobile signal strength information for? 

Knowing the mobile signal strength for your living or working space enables you to see where you might need to boost the signal. Using Field Test Mode can enable you to perform a site survey, which gives you a floor plan analysis of your home or business.

The purchase of mobile signal boosters (also known as network repeaters, signal amplifiers, signal repeaters etc) should be based on the results of a site survey. 

Carrying out a site survey involves taking several accurate signal strength readings from in and around your home or office building. These readings can help you to calculate whether a signal booster will help and what devices you will need. 

Field Test Mode is ideal for carrying out a site survey. Basing it on signal bars is not reliable compared to the precise numerical value of decibel you get from this tool. Carrying out a site survey using Field Test Mode is very straightforward (as you will have seen from the steps above) and helps you to measure the mobile signal strength of your home or business using just your phone. 

What do the Decibel numbers mean? 

If you are connected to a non-LTE network (2G, 3G, 4G H+), the value you get is the Received SIgnal Strength Indicator (RSSI). This is a method of measuring wireless signals. 

LTE networks however, are usually measured in Reference SIgnal Received Power (RSRP) which is why LTE readings can be very different to the readings for previous generations like above. 

You’ll find that Decibel signal strengths are usually double or triple digits and are marked as a negative number. Your phone might not show the negative sign though. The stronger the signal, the closer the number is to zero, so -89 is a stronger signal that -99. 

The unit of measurement in all this is decibel (dB) – This measures the power of the mobile signal. This value is telling you how strong your phone is receiving the signal from your provider’s mobile network. 

Did you know that the Decibel scale is not linear? If the signal strength increases by 3dB, then it is twice as strong. Signal strength that increases by 10 dB is an increase of ten times the signal strength. So, in real terms, an RSSI value of -50 is actually ten times stronger than an RSSI measurement of -60. 

Why is Field Test Mode so Important?

If you are planning to install a mobile phone signal booster, then it’s absolutely vital that you have an accurate reading of your Received Signal Strength across your business or home. Field Test Mode can help you do just this and inform your site survey ready to help you make the right booster purchase. 

Field Test Mode enables you to see exactly how strong your mobile signal strength is – Both inside and outside your building. 

Field Test Mode is an essential tool when it comes to assessing how a mobile signal booster can improve your reception.

Call the Experts

If all this has got your head in a bit of a spin, then why not let the experts do it for you? Our Wi-Fi Experts are trained professionals in all things wireless. We can provide you with a site survey to help assess your mobile signal strength. Give us a call today

PCI: What Is The Difference Between 4G LTE and 5G NR

In this blog we are going to look at the difference between 4G LTE and 5G-NR, specifically in terms of PCI. 

 

What is PCI when it comes to 4G / 5G?

 

PCI is the Physical Cell ID and is one of the most important ways a cell identifies itself in a 4G or 5G wireless network.

The physical layer (or PHY-layer) Cell ID is what determines the Cell ID Group and Cell ID Sector, and it is this that is needed for DL synchronisation. 

DL (Downlink) Synchronisation is the process in which a UE (phone) detects the radio boundary and OFDM symbol boundary. In other words, the exact timing of when a radio frame or OFDM starts. (In telecommunications, orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a type of digital transmission and a method of encoding digital data on multiple carrier frequencies.) 

This DL synchronisation process is done by detecting and analysing the SS Block. From a UE’s (phone’s) point of view, Downlink is the ‘receiving’ transmitting direction. The SS Block (SSB) stands for Synchronisation Signal Block and refers to the synchronisation signal and Physical Broadcast Channel (PBCH) as a single block that always moves together.

 

Why is PCI Planning important? 

 

If you are planning, designing and deploying a 4G / 5G network, then PCI Planning will be one of your most important steps. 

Making sure your network is properly designed with PCI in mind will ensure your network works efficiently and increases how your resources are utilised. 

Excellent PCI planning ensures QoS for those who are subscribed to your 4G / 5G network.

QoS (Quality of Service) is the use of technologies to control traffic on your network, ensuring that the performance of critical applications meets requirements.

The key goal here is to use QoS and PCI Planning to enable your network to prioritise traffic, offering dedicated bandwidth and lower latency.

PCI is one of the technologies used to enhance performance of business applications, WANs and service provider networks. 

Poor planning in this area can result in PCI collisions and conflicts – Which in turn, negatively impact the overall performance of your network.

 

How is the PCI value created?

 

The PCI value is created from two components – PSS (Primary Synchronisation Signal) and SSS (Secondary Synchronisation Signal). 

The PSS is used to obtain the slot, ub-frame and half-frame boundary as well as providing the cell identity within the cell identity group. 

The SSS is used to obtain the radio frame boundary (10ms) as well as enabling the UE (phone) to determine the cell identity group.

After your UE (phone) has successfully decoded the PSS and SSS, it will be able to calculate the PCI. It uses the following formula:

PCI = (3 × SSS) + PSS

 

How is PCI calculated for 4G?

 

PSS has 3 values (0,1 and 2) and is created using the Zad-off Chu sequence.The PSS helps to accomplish slot and symbol synchronisation in the time domain.

SSS has 168 values (0 to 167) and is produced using concatenation (linking together in a series) of 2 m-sequences (max length sequence). The SSS helps to achieve radio frame synchronisation.

The formula to work out PCI for 4G is therefore:

PCI = (3 * 167) + 2 = 503

This means that there are PCI values varying from 0 to 503 LTE, which in turn supports 504 unique PCIs for 4G. 

 

How is PCI calculated for 5G?

 

PSS has 3 values (0,1 and 2) and created using m-sequence. 

SSS has 336 values (0 to 335) and is generated using the product of 2 m-sequences.

In 5G-NR (a new radio access technology developed by 3GPP for the 5G (fifth generation) mobile network), the basic structure of PSS is the same but the number of SSS is increased.

The formula to work out PCI for 4G is therefore:

PCI = (3 * 335) + 2 = 1007

So the PCI values will vary from 0 to 1007. This means that 5G-NR can support 1008 unique PCIs.

 

What does this difference in PCI between 4G and 5G actually mean? 

 

In the simplest terms, 5G-NR has double the number of PCI’s, compared to LTE 4G. 

5G has more Physical Cell IDs (the actual area that the cell antenna on a cell site is covering). Each 5G NR cell has a Physical Cel lD. 5G has 1008 unique possible Physical Cell ID’s, whereas 4G has only 504. 

So if we’re connected to Vodafone on Physical Cell ID No.1, but we could also see Vodafone signals being broadcast out of that cell tower on different cell antennas using Physical Cell ID No,2 and No3, then our mobile device would know to connect to No1. It would get confused if it connected to No.2 or No.3 and impact the quality of service.

The user device connects to the one physically nearest. So for example, a Vodafone tower has two cell antennas out the top broadcasting the Vodafone signal across an area, which will overlap to a small degree. A user’s device will always want to make sure it is connecting to the same one. You don’t want to connect to one antenna and back to another – It’s this that ruins the quality of service. So you will always try and connect back to the one you were talking to, which is normally geographically the one closest to you. 

The Physical Cell ID is used to identify each space. We don’t want those numbers to overlap too often, or our devices get confused and don’t know which to connect to. If a device can see a Physical Cell ID of 2, and there’s another cell antenna using an ID of 2, it wouldn’t know which one to communicate with.

It is beneficial to know that 5G-NR has more PCI’s available in the planning stages, to enable a higher quality of service (QoS) for end user devices.



Wi-Fi and Connectivity Options for Village Halls

Did you know that village halls in need of a bit of updating and renovation can apply for a share of a £3m fund, all in honour of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee?

 

This follows the tradition of village hall investments for Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897 and King George V’s Silver Jubilee in 1935. 

 

125 lucky village hall recipients will have a share of the £3m fund, which can be put towards renovations and building improvements including Wi-Fi.  

 

You might well be hosting or celebrating in your local village hall for this weekend’s Jubilee celebrations! Village halls are often the heart of communities, bringing people together. It’s vital these hubs stay well connected with strong, reliable Wi-Fi. 

Wi-Fi for Village Halls – A Quick Guide

If you’re a part of the committee that looks after your local village hall, then you’ll know that there is an ever-increasing need for these community buildings to offer broadband and Wi-Fi access to their users. 

 

Not only will this support a wide range of community activities and events, it will also enhance the facilities you can offer as a venue to those who hire your space. 

 

So what do you need to consider to improve digital connectivity for your communities and businesses by making sure your village hall is well connected? 

 

Get a Broadband Connection


Before even thinking about Wi-Fi or broadband, you need to make sure you have a telephone landline. The only exception is if you are able to get cable or fibre access to the hall. You can read more about FTTP in one of our previous blogs here. Make sure that you have a business contract rather than residential, as it will be for public use. 

 

To get a new telephone line, order one through BT.com. After that’s done, you can upgrade to broadband. Always make sure you check with the ISP that you are able to make your internet connection available to the public before placing your order. 

 

If you want to get broadband without a landline, you would need to be able to have a cable, full fibre or mobile broadband connection. More on that later! 

 

Not got an official postal address? Some village halls don’t actually have an official post office address which can cause problems with some ISP’s as they may insist that you have one in order to place an order. If you find this is the case, you can contact the Post Office and request an official address here.

 

Some ISP’s will accept what’s known as an ‘unserved’ building but they may ask to do an initial survey before they confirm your order.  

 

How much will it cost to install Wi-Fi in a village hall?

You will need to incur some costs to get Wi-Fi successfully set up in your village hall. Bear in mind the following likely outgoings:

  • Installation and connection costs for a new telephone line (plus VAT) and broadband connection (if required)
  • Line rental for the telephone line (ongoing costs)
  • Data usage charges from broadband / Wi-Fi use (ongoing costs)
  • Any work required to install the Wi-Fi router in a secure location, plus additional devices that may be needed to boost Wi-Fi signal 

 

You can help keep costs to a minimum by shopping around for the best contract available on price comparison websites. Remember you need a business contract, not a residential one! Make sure you balance out the costs with data usage limits and of course, reliability.

 

Remember though, making improvements with the Wi-Fi in your village hall is investing in its successful future. It’s vital that these community hubs are well connected for their users. And even better if you can get the costs covered by securing part of the £3m Jubilee fund!

 

Security

 

We cannot express enough how important it is to make sure that your Wi-Fi is secure. You should manage and filter the access to your Wi-Fi signal. 

 

If you were to allow unmanaged access to your Wi-Fi, people may use your broadband connection for illegal purposes. By providing the Wi-Fi for this, you could be liable. 

 

Luckily for you, it’s super easy to manage your Wi-Fi security – And definitely not something that should put you off setting up a Wi-Fi connection in your village hall. 

 

To minimise the risk of inappropriate use, you should:

 

  • Install your router in a secure place where only authorised users are able to physically access it. Don’t let people connect to your router via Ethernet cable as they could make changes.
  • Routers usually display the passwords you need in order to manage and access your Wi-Fi connection. If you think it’s possible for unauthorised users to access this information, then consider changing the User ID and admin password (instructions on how to do this should be in your router user guide).
  • Regularly change your Wi-Fi access password for users. This means that only current users will be able to use your Wi-Fi connection, rather than someone who isn’t authorised or is re-using a password they’ve previously been issued with.
  • Always ensure that the parental control setting is switched on. This prevents access to any unsuitable websites on your Wi-Fi connection. You can use your router manual to set appropriate firewall settings to set the level of restriction required. 

 

 

The router in our village hall doesn’t reach the whole building

 

If you already have a router installed in your village hall, but it’s not reaching far enough and you’re struggling with black spots or slower Wi-Fi in certain places then you may need to extend your Wi-Fi coverage. 

 

This is particularly relevant if you have a large village hall building – The signal just may not be strong enough to reach everywhere it needs to from one router. 

 

We mentioned above that it’s important for the router to be in a secure area so unauthorised people cannot access it. This could mean that it’s been placed in a less than ideal location for signal strength and connectivity. It’s vital to balance the two! 

 

Ideally, you will be able to place the router in a central location, but if that is not the case then you may need to install other devices to extend the signal to other locations within your village hall building. You could potentially use a powerline adapter or a Wi-Fi extender to boost the signal strength and get wider Wi-Fi coverage in the building. 

 

Mobile Broadband for Rural Village Halls

You and your users might not be in London, but that doesn’t mean that you don’t expect the same Wi-Fi connection that you get in urban areas – Despite being in more rural ones. 

 

Unfortunately there are many parts of the countryside that are suffering from a broadband deficit – Indeed, there seems to be a connectivity imbalance across the countryside, with many village halls struggling.

Over the past year particularly, we’ve installed countless numbers of external 4G antennas and routers in rural areas, effectively replacing the broadband through the telephone cable using a data SIM card.

 

You can read more about our 4G Mobile Broadband solutions in a previous blog of ours here

 

If you are wary about whether Mobile Broadband could work in your more rural village hall, then our Cellular Survey could be just what you need. We can map the availability of cellular and data coverage within a building and report the details of phone coverage for 2G, 3G, 4G/LTE and 5G. We can measure the cellular connectivity, data upload and download speeds and the occurrence of dropped and failed calls for all the main mobile network operators. You can read more about this here

 

Want to know more about how Geekabit could help get your village hall connected?

For further information about securing a strong Wi-Fi connection in your village hall, please email our Wi-Fi experts at info@geekabit.co.uk and someone will be in touch as soon as possible.

 

We work out of London, Hampshire and Cardiff, covering community buildings, businesses and larger residential properties. 

 

What is 6GHz Wi-Fi?

Did you know that following the historic decision by USA’s FCC in April 2020 to release 1200 MHz of bandwidth in 6 GHz space for unlicensed use, UK regulators cleared unlicensed wireless usage in the 6 GHz spectrum to give 6GHz WiFi a huge boost back in July 2020. 

 

This regulatory go-ahead enables your router to broadcast over the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands. What does this mean in real life terms? Simply, it means there are now a lot more open airwaves that routers can use to broadcast Wi-Fi signals. This in turn means faster, more reliable connections from the next generation of devices.

 

This is the biggest spectrum addition in over 30 years – In fact, since the FCC cleared the way for Wi-Fi back in 1989. Pretty huge right? It means the space available for routers and other devices have quadruple the amount in this new spectrum. This means a lot more bandwidth for the user and less interference for their devices. 

 

For the past 20 years we’ve had the Wi-Fi Alliance that oversees the implementation of Wi-Fi. This change in the spectrum is the most ‘monumental decision’ during their existence. You’ll be seeing this implementation as Wi-Fi 6E, with more and more enabled devices becoming available. 

 

Will Wi-Fi 6E fix my bad Wi-Fi? 

 

There’s a good chance that spectrum congestion has interfered with your ability to connect to your Wi-Fi network in the past. When there are a lot of devices all trying to connect over the same band of frequencies, some devices will drop out. Have a look at your local area for Wi-Fi networks – If there is a long list, that could be why you’re struggling with a slow connection and less than favourable reliability. This is because there are too many competing signals, which stops your device getting through. It’s hoped that gains in 6GHz performance will last, even when they are more widely used than they are now. 

 

Not only does Wi-Fi 6E offer new airwaves for routers to use, they are also more spacious airwaves that have less overlapping signals which can cause problems on some other Wi-Fi channels. 

 

The new spectrum doesn’t use any of the previous spectrum, yet offers space for up to 7 maximum-capacity Wi-Fi streams which can all be broadcast simultaneously without causing interference with each other. 

 

Here’s the geeky bit… The UK telecoms regulator, Ofcom, made it possible for home Wi-Fi networks to harness 500MHz of radio spectrum frequency in the new 6GHz band, which will significantly boost the speed of licence-exempt indoor home wireless networks via Wi-Fi 6/6E. 

 

What is 6GHz? 

 

Basically, Wi-Fi works by broadcasting over airwaves that are open for anyone to use. Previously, this was over two bands: 2.4GHz and 5GHz. This third band, 6GHz, is quadrupling the available space for traditional Wi-Fi. 

 

What do the numbers mean? 2.4GHz can travel further, but 6GHz travels faster. The main thing however is that the number of airwaves available on the6GHz band is quadruple what has been available before. Exciting stuff! 

 

On a personal ‘how will this affect me’ level, it means that if you live in a block of flats, and you are the first person to get a 6GHz router, then you won’t be competing with anyone for a connection. The great thing is that even as 6GHz routers become more popular, it’s likely that signals will stay faster and stronger than previously as it’s a more spacious spectrum.  

 

Will Wi-Fi 6E be faster?

 

It’s not quite as straight forward as that, but Wi-Fi 6E will sort of be faster. Theoretically, 6GHz Wi-Fi has the same top speed as 5GHz Wi-Fi. The maximum Wi-Fi 6 standard speed is 9.6 Gbps. Now, you’re not going to actuall get that speed in real life, however having access to the new airwaves could well increase your speed. 

 

The available spectrum at 5GHz means that Wi-Fi signals aren’t as large as they could be. Whereas, it’s thought that routers at 6GHz will broadcast at the current maximum allowable channel size. That in itself, means a faster connection. 

 

These new networks could see smartphone Wi-Fi connections hit 1–2 Gbps. You might be wondering how this compares to 5G – Indeed, these are the speeds expected from millimetre-wave 5G. However, that has very limited availability. 

 

Remember that your internet speeds will also always depend on / be limited by your provider. But it could still be a huge jump for connectivity.  

 

Can I buy Wi-Fi 6 devices?

 

Here in the UK we started to see Wi-Fi 6 devices creep onto the market in the last year or so, once the Wi-Fi Alliance started offering certification for Wi-Fi 6E. Deployment has been slow and steady, with more Wi-Fi 6 enables devices appearing bit by bit. We’re on course for the next generation of Wi-Fi networks.

 

Wi-Fi 6E enabled devices are most seen in smartphones and then tablets, with TV’s likely to follow suit. We use our phones for almost everything, so it’s no surprise that it’s this device that will be top of the list for Wi-Fi 6E. 

 

How do I know if a device supports Wi-Fi 6E?

 

The most widely used Wi-Fi standard on current devices is probably still Wi-Fi 6, the standard previous to Wi-Fi 6E, which you could still see on the box of a new device. This isn’t such a bad thing – It means that the device supports that Wi-Fi standard and offers efficient Wi-Fi performance. 

 

What you should probably start looking out for when buying a new device is Wi-Fi 6E – It’s this one that is extended into the 6GHz band. All devices, like smartphones, tablets, laptops and routers should have backward compatibility – Meaning they will work with any previous Wi-Fi standard to the one that’s stated on the box. This means that you can enjoy available connections even when Wi-Fi 6E isn’t available. 

 

Be aware that even if you buy a Wi-Fi 6E compatible device, you will enjoy the benefits of that when you use it with a Wi-Fi 6E router. 

 

6GHz will become an integral part of Wi-Fi 6 and future generations of Wi-Fi. This means that at some point, you will have to replace your devices with ones that are Wi-Fi 6E compatible to be able to enjoy all the benefits the extra spectrum has to offer. 

 

Due to the Wi-Fi Alliance certification programme, only efficient Wi-Fi 6 devices will be certificated. 

 

It’s worth bearing in mind that the 6GHz spectrum does have some existing licensed users. This means that particularly in outdoor spaces,  Wi-Fi will have to work around them. Outside, routers will need to use something called an “automated frequency control” system. This ensure that they don’t interfere with these existing 6GHz users. Because that means less space to broadcast, there could be degradation of overall performance in some areas.

 

Does Wi-Fi 6E have anything to do with 5G? 

 

We touched on this earlier, but no, they don’t have anything to do with each other really. It just happens that both of these networks are being spoken about a lot, simultaneously. 5G is everywhere, is it not!

 

We keep saying about Wi-Fi 6E being a new spectrum, but really it’s not new, it’s always been there, it’s just been unlicensed. Now, people can use the 6GHz spectrum without a license in their homes. 

 

This also means that other technologies could try to make use of the 6GHz band, which could in turn take up some of the space that Wi-Fi wants to use. 5G is one of the technologies that could be a rival for the space on the 6GHz band. 

 

There is a possibility that 5G could overlap on the new Wi-Fi 6E spectrum through mobile network carriers. This could in turn lead to interference issues, but it’s a bit early to say. If you’re wondering whether 5G will become dominant and replace Wi-Fi altogether, then we think probably not. There doesn’t need to be a winner or a loser when it comes to Wi-Fi 6E vs 5G – They dont necessarily have to be in competition with one another. The spacious nature of this spectrum means there should be enough room for both. 

 

6GHz Wi-Fi is certainly being revered by the tech industry, so we’re pretty hopeful that Wi-Fi will be the main beneficiary of the newly opened 6GHz spectrum. 

 

How to Remotely Monitor a Robustel 4G Router

In this blog we’re going to show you how you can link the Robustel 4G router with other platforms, so you can monitor your router remotely in real time, in a way that best fits with your business operations. 

 

Who are Robustel?

Robustel are used across various industries including Retail, Healthcare, Transport, Oil & Gas, Manufacturing, Security, Agriculture and Smart Cities. 

 

The design and manufacture of Robustel products provides industrial quality wireless routers, modems and gateways for Wi-Fi, cellular and LPWAN networks. This includes 3G/4G/LTE/5G in cellular networks and Cat-M1/NB-IoT/LoRaWAN/Bluetooth in LPWAN networks. 

 

Robustel customers are provided with EDGE Computing, Cloud Software and end-to-end IoT Solutions to complement the hardware. 

 

If you’re an enterprise or mobile network looking for a competitive edge in the IoT market, then Robustel could be just the thing. They are passionate about long-term relationships with their customers and partners, and work alongside many distribution partners in 120 countries including the UK.

 

Robustel work with businesses across the world in various industries – Solving connectivity problems with scalable, robust and secure IoT solutions. Whether you are just looking for the hardware or a complete  ‘IoT in a box’, Robustel will have a solution. 

 

So where does Geekabit come in, you might be wondering?

 

Well, while Robustel has an excellent interface for remote diagnosis and simple email notifications, it does not provide automated notifications to other platforms, with checks sent to your IT support teams.

 

How can Geekabit help with Robustel 4G router monitoring?

 

Here at Geekabit, we can provide access to our router monitoring software platform for real-time notifications of uptime, downtime, speed issues via:

  • Slack 
  • Teams
  • Text message
  • Automated phone calls

If none of those are sufficient, we can also provide an API connection to automatically import your Robustel notifications to the platform of your choosing.

 

Get in touch

 

If you have or are considering a Robustel router for your use case, but are not sure of the benefits vs a Teltonika router, please speak with one of our Wi-Fi experts.

 

If you think a 4G router will not provide sufficient upload and download speeds for your use case, please get in touch with us here at Geekabit

 

By using the right combination of equipment, external antennas, research and evidence based placement, we can dramatically increase what is possible.

 

Image from Robustel.com – Product shown is the R1520 Dual-SIM Cellular VPN Router.

Enterprise 5G: What You Need To Know 

You may be wondering what 5G means for enterprises. You may well have googled it and landed here! The prevalence of 5G will help to empower businesses – Allowing them to create new experiences and connect in more inventive ways.. 5G will help to change how we work and how we play as well as providing the solution for many problems. Some of them we might not even know about yet! There is a constant buzz in the air surrounding 5G and the excitement of all the possibilities it brings. It might also be causing a bit of FOMO – Businesses will not want to be the ones left behind. 

 

5G is quite often used as a backup for 4G – But those days may soon be over. Businesses will need to start considering using 5G as their primary mobile network, as well as the possibility of using it or their wireless environment – Negating the need for office wiring. 

 

Transformation is happening across all industries – As it tends to do with the introduction of new technology. An ever-changing world! 5G could well be the latest key when it comes to boosting the ambition of your business and increasing the confidence of enterprise customers. 

 

There are 3 main take homes when it comes to Enterprise 5G:

  • This year, the investment in 5G looks strong in enterprises across industries
  • Confidence in the ability to implement 5G successfully is low (only 25% of enterprises feel very confident about effective implementation)
  • Sustainability needs must be met by 5G providers and IoT use

 

The level of current and future spending on emerging technologies is looking healthy, yet there are some significant challenges that industrial 5G needs to overcome. With only a quarter of enterprises feeling confident in their ability to implement 5G successfully, it is vital that 5G providers can help enterprises to get set up. 

 

So what do our 5G providers need to know? Well they need to know what enterprises are thinking when it comes to 5G implementation in order for them to become trusted business partners. 

 

There are several key insights that need to be considered for Enterprise 5G. 

 

Adoption of 5G is not guaranteed


Just because the intention to invest in 5G is there, doesn’t mean it’s a given. The future looks bright in terms of enterprises adopting emerging technologies over the next few years, with investments likely to rise.  The intention to invest in 5G is highest amongst enterprises adopting new technologies. 17% have already invested, and 56% plan to invest in the next 1-3 years. Only 12% are not planning to invest whilst they monitor technological changes.

It seems that organisations are mostly interested in 5G for its use in helping them to meet their sustainability goals as well as improving supply chain management.

This doesn’t mean that 5G implementation is guaranteed. Indeed, just because 5G is becoming more mainstream, doesn’t mean that all organisations are going to stay receptive to it. Asian companies planning to invest in 5G is actually down 10% in comparison to last year.

 

Enterprise 5G Vision Becomes Defensive

 

The mindset towards 5G and IoT is prizing efficiency and optimization instead of entering adjacent markets and driving top-line growth. The top priority of enterprises when it comes to IoT is operational efficiency. Similarly, less enterprises want to spend on IoT for new products and services. 5G application uses for VR and AR seem to be diminishing.

We also need to look at Environmental, Social and Governance consideration as although these are fueling interest in 5G, they are also necessitating new demands on tech providers. Sustainability is a hot topic at the moment, and almost 50% of businesses don’t feel their sustainability needs are being met by 5G vendors.

 

New ways of buying and deploying 5G are well received by enterprises

 

Enterprises seem very receptive to 5G solutions, with over three quarters of businesses interested in using private networks to support the implementation of 5G. Furthermore, 50% of businesses thought that purchasing private network capabilities was an important 5G investment strategy. The reasons being that it provided more control of their network and improved reliability.

It would seem that the lack of confidence in 5G implementation could lead to businesses purchasing 5G through a MVNO (mobile virtual network operator). This implies that the relationship between telecommunications operators and enterprise customers could be in jeopardy. They need to ensure that 5G offerings are offered with easy market strategies.

 

Focus on 5G’s relationship to other technologies, with less attention on cyber risks

 

It looks like one of the top priorities for businesses is looking at the relationship of 5G with other technologies. It would be beneficial for enterprises to receive ongoing information and education on emerging technologies and how they relate to each other for their business needs. Not understanding the relationship between 5G and other emerging technologies could cause challenges.

Rather incredibly, less than a quarter of businesses viewed reducing the risk of cyber threats a priority in terms of IoT and 5G. We cannot stress enough how vital it is for enterprises to design their 5G and IoT deployments with security in mind. This is not a blind spot that can be ignored.

 

Telecommunication operators are falling behind network vendors



Enterprises are supporting their 5G deployments with their technology and telecoms providers, often following selection criteria based on price. Pricing seems to even come above the speed of execution.

It seems that enterprises don’t just want a technology supplier – They want a transformation partner. And who the experts are in this area is fairly evenly split between application and platform vendors and professional services firms. Hot on their heels are network equipment vendors! Less than a fifth of enterprises view telecommunication operators as experts in digital transformation. Whilst trusted as IoT experts, they need to prove their ability to deliver new connectivity transformations.

 

Ambitious ecosystem strategies for enterprises

 

Enterprises are wanting to take advantage of new technologies and ecosystem collaboration is one route towards these new skills and knowledge. Much of their 5 year growth is based within business ecosystem collaboration. There is a growing emphasis on developing cross-sector partnerships as well as shortening the time between new products and services, and revenue. These are ambitious drivers of ecosystem strategies.

Perhaps the most important takeaway from all this is that nearly three quarters of businesses are prioritising suppliers that can offer the relevant ecosystem relationships as part of their 5G capabilities. This means that any 5G provider needs to meet their customers needs and expectations by tapping into these fast-changing corporate ecosystems.  

 

 

Get in touch

 

If you’re struggling with wired broadband, and not getting the reliable internet connection you need in your business, then 5G could be a fantastic option for you.

 

It can feel like a big jump to give up on your wired broadband connection and opt for 5G – Which is where our Cell Coverage survey comes in.

We can tell you exactly whether 5G broadband would work for you, and which network would be most reliable.

 

Give our Wi-Fi experts a call or email us today!

 

How do I get reliable Wi-Fi in my garden? 

Hello Spring heatwave! Hampshire, as well as other parts of the UK, have been treated to a bit of a March heatwave this week with sunny days that are feeling really warm. Finally! And now that many more of us find ourselves working from home more often, we wouldn’t be surprised if you’re trying to figure out a way to get all your gear out into the garden and Wi-Fi working well. 

 

Whether you’re soaking up the sun during Zoom meetings or attempting to escape the same 4 walls with some fresh air whilst answering emails – You’re going to need a strong, reliable Wi-Fi connection in your sun-soaked Hampshire garden. 

 

And no, it’s not okay to steal your neighbour’s Wi-Fi – Even if you know their password!

 

So, if you’re trying to make the most of the sunshine that Hampshire currently has on offer, then here are our top tips for getting strong, reliable Wi-Fi in your garden. 

 

Use an Access Point


Our first recommendation would be to run an ethernet cable out to the garden area and install a new access point. 

 

Many of our Hampshire based clients have homes where this option has worked really effectively. There are other options (see below) but this would always be our preference and recommendation when being asked how to get Wi-Fi in your garden. 


Where is your router? 

 

Is your router in the best place? You could try moving your existing router to see if a change of location improves the signal you get in your garden. 

 

We’ve visited many Hampshire homes where the router has been situated at the front of the house, most commonly in the front room next to the smart TV or telephone. This location makes it unlikely for the signal to be able to reach your back garden. 

 

Consider where you access the internet the most, and whether you could move your router to a different location that would work for both the house and the garden.

 

Extend your Wi-Fi range with a repeater 

 

If the range of your router won’t reach the garden from a suitable location inside the house, then there are ways you can extend it. A repeater is one possible solution, and works particularly well in larger homes. Some of our Hampshire based clients have found that a repeater has solved their Wi-Fi woes when it comes to getting a reliable signal in the garden. 

 

The pros – By placing a repeater in range of the garden, you can make your Wi-Fi go further. It’s cost effective and easy to configure. 

 

The cons – It works by mimicking your existing network and creating a new one. You would have to manually change the connection on your device when you move between the garden and the house. This option can also half your bandwidth, resulting in slower internet speeds.

 

Extend your Wi-Fi range with an extender

 

By using an extender, you can extend the range of your router by plugging it in at a position where it will provide coverage to your garden. 

 

An extender is cabled and takes internet signal directly from the router and emits it from a better location. Despite being slightly more expensive and a bit more complicated to configure than the repeater, our resident Wi-Fi expert says, 

 

One of the biggest benefits of an extender is that it is connected using a wired connection, so there is no need for a wireless signal to operate it. This also means that the bandwidth stays at its full potential.

 

We’d recommend that you consider calling in the experts if you’re considering this option – And we reckon our clients that are currently enjoying Geekabit installed Wi-Fi extenders in their sunny Hampshire hotspot would say the same! 

 

Mobile Tethering

If your smartphone has good reception outside, then you can use its Wi-Fi hotspot and tether that to your laptop or other device to use its connection. 

 

However, it’s worth bearing in mind that the data you use will come off your monthly allowance, and if you go over it can be rather a costly mistake.

 

This option is probably more suited to those ‘one-off’ moments – Perhaps to tide you over while you wait for one of Geekabit’s Wi-Fi experts to come and sort out a more long-term Wi-Fi connection in your garden. 

 

Get in touch

 

So there you go, some of our top tips on how to get Wi-Fi in your garden so you can enjoy the Spring sunshine whilst working from home!

 

If you’ve tried the options above and still no joy, don’t be afraid to call in the experts! Our Wi-Fi experts are on the other end of a phone call or email and are happy to help get your Wi-Fi working as it should. 

 

We work out of Hampshire, London and Cardiff and are really passionate about getting people the Wi-Fi connection they deserve.